How to Keep the Flu Away: Supercharge Your Immune System

It is extremely important in staying healthy to keep a regimen of physical activity. This is actually very important with regard to chronic illnesses and diseases as well as just being in good health. The amount of physical activity is probably one of the biggest predictors of mortality for many types of patients suffering from multiple conditions. If you’ve been hospitalized especially then you might be at risk of being readmitted to the hospital for the same condition greatly related to your lack of physical activity. Particularly if you happen to be elderly, you are at a higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if you aren’t moving your body around. Furthermore you’re at greater risk of catching certain viruses such as Ebola or other flues that might be otherwise ineffective if your immune system was in a more peak condition – say if you had been doing physical exercise. They have been testing a lot of ways to prevent diseases using reagents to find the presence of certain pathogens or antibodies in order to come up with immunizations but the best prevention of many viruses continues to be a good immune system.

Immune System Health

To keep viruses away without the use of immunizations, it’s very important your immune system is supercharged. One of the best ways to keep it supercharged is by staying active. An active lifestyle reduces the amount of free-radicals in your body which are caused by stress. Free-radicals are protons with a positive charge, whereas electrons or “antioxidants” are considered to bring the body into a negative electrical state making it much more difficult for any sickness or disease to survive.

Lung function and the Immune System

When you consider that many viruses are contracted through the air and in the lungs, it’s a good thought to keep your lungs actively pulling and pushing air from the entire capacity of the lungs. If you have a rather sedentary lifestyle, you aren’t going to be utilizing the entire lung capacity each day which could be a breeding ground for infection. Getting exercise helps to keep the lungs healthy and is connected to the immune system all over again.

Treatments for diseases that people contract do seem to be improving however the viruses seem to be getting stronger. Better efficacy of treatments currently available would highly useful for assessing the value of treatments in response to COPD along with other robust studies which correlate to the different aspects of disease history. Looking into our future, we need to know our past and how we got here. The best doctor is the one inside of you and nobody is going to take a greater interest in your health than you, so be a good doctor and get some daily exercise. Your immune system and those around you will thank you.